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Our Story

Healing deep wounds. Together.

The Healing Fund for Japanese Canadians began as a local Vancouver community movement in 2006, focusing on the public disclosure of Mr. Nakayama's decades of clergy sexual abuse from the Anglican Church of Canada. We have made great strides at each step leading to the creation of the Healing Fund for Japanese Canadians, a project that will promote and support healing efforts among survivors and their families, and for the community.

 

We challenge the decades-long history of secrecy surrounding these crimes and will work with you in your healing journey.

Members of the Healing Fund Project Office

Judy Hanazawa, Connie Kadota, Emiko Lashin, Wendy Matsubuchi-Bremner, Liz Nunoda, Kevin Okabe, Naomi Shikaze, and Peter Wallace

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Peter Tatsuo Wallace, Project Manager - Vancouver

I have been involved with the Healing Fund since 2018. That summer I read a novel that discussed Mr. Nakayama and I asked my grandmother, a Nisei, if this information was true. That's when she shared with me my own family connection to this man. Later that year I was introduced to Judy Hanazawa and I joined the local Vancouver Japanese Canadian community movement to help right these historic wrongs.

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Judy Hanazawa - Vancouver

I’m Kiyoko Judy Hanazawa.  My ancestry on both sides, like many in our community, originated in Mio, Wakayama-ken, Japan. My grandparents set roots in Steveston, BC and they and my parents worked in the fishing industry before and after 1942. I grew up in the Strathcona area of Vancouver, eventually became a child and family service social worker and later a consultant, achieving an MSW after receiving redress in 1989. I have been involved in this project since 2006. I and other long term members of the working group remain committed to ensuring the current healing fund program, offering counselling, survivor family education grants and community education - will be successfully delivered.

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Emiko Lashin - Vancouver

My name is Emiko (Emi) Lashin. Part of the kanji for Emiko carries with it the meaning of "giver" and sure enough I have ended up pursuing giving professions such as nursing, teaching and counselling. I am presently retired but very active in the community. I have worked with many "movers and shakers" in the community, Judy Hanazawa being one of them. We learned about GG Nakayama about 16 years ago and have been working on obtaining retribution for the survivors of his abuse ever since.

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Wendy Matsubuchi-Bremner - North Vancouver

I am Wendy Matsubuchi-Bremner, yonsei/4th gen from North Vancouver. My mother is Esther Yorimi Sunohara [Marpole, Slocan, Toronto] and my father was Edward Takeshi Matsubuchi [Cumberland, Hastings Park, Greenwood, Montreal]. After decades of pursuing justice for at least four of her brothers, Mom handed over the torch to me and told me it was my turn to advocate for all survivors and justice.

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Kevin Okabe, CPA, CA - Karnanaskis (Alberta)

Kevin is the Executive Director for the NAJC and has been providing management and administrative support to the project on behalf of the NAJC. He is a Yonsei (father’s side) and Nisei (mother’s side) and has been involved as a volunteer in the Japanese Canadian community for over thirty years, leveraging from his experience as a consultant, small business owner and business executive.  Locally, he helped organize Japanese Canadian youth groups and served on the boards of community organizations including as the former President of the Calgary Japanese Community Association.  He served for five terms on the NAJC National Executive Board as a Director, Secretary and Treasurer for the NAJC.

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